Chapter Two, Part One of REPAIRING THE LEGACY

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With this segment of Chapter Two of Repairing the Legacy, we continue the serialization of Repairing the Legacy. This is a rough draft work in progress and may not reflect the final form. Time period: set after the ending of The Martiniere Legacy main trilogy, before the Epilogue (for this chapter). I’m breaking longer chapters into sections for readability. This is the first part of Chapter Two.

December, 2059

GABE

The conversation he squelched between Ruby and Justine about younger sons during the night of their arrival continued to haunt Gabe two…


First of all, your assertion that the risk to children is low is dangerously out of date. We now have children dying and suffering from long-haul Covid. Oh, you consider those rates to be extraordinarily low?

Fine. Tell that to the parents of the affected children. Or look to your ancestors who kept their children out of swimming pools during the summers of the '50s because of polio, for another recent example.

Additionally, you are wrong about the lack of consideration given to these other risk factors. They have been discussed--I know this because even though I am a retired…


REPAIRING THE LEGACY: Chapter One, Part Two

Photo from Depositphotos

With this segment of Chapter One of Repairing the Legacy, we continue the serialization of Repairing the Legacy. This is a rough draft work in progress and may not reflect the final form. Time period: set after the ending of The Martiniere Legacy main trilogy, before the Epilogue (for this chapter). I’m breaking longer chapters into sections for readability. This is the second and final part of Chapter One.

December, 2059

RUBY

Ruby couldn’t help but stifle a yawn as they rode through Paris, cobblestones and pavement glimmering damp under streetlights. They had…


I'm a little old lady who drives a secondhand Toyota Tundra and lives in a rural area. That Tundra pulls a horse trailer, hauls bricks, hay, gravel, and firewood. It also travels single-lane backroads when we go out foraging for mushrooms and just want to get out there. The suspension and, most importantly, the clearance and the heavier-duty tires not only make the ride comfortable but safer due to a lesser likelihood of the tires blowing out. It's probably our last truck, that is, unless we get something like the Ford Lightning in a few years.

Yeah, yeah, you cruised…


Oooh, those Martinieres. They are very, very tricksy characters.

I’ve been doing editing work on The Netwalk Sequence series and just poking a little bit at the current chapter of Repairing the Legacy, in part because I’m dealing with a complicated plot twist and resolution. Including a new antagonist who popped up his head in the last chapter (“Research Complications”).

So what slid into my head the other evening, as I was dropping off to sleep?

A whole new tangent. A “What If” scenario that goes back to the very foundation of Gabe’s character.

What if…Gabe’s stepfather, mother, and sister…


They told us what their goal was. They were most explicit about it, and have been for the last forty years. I am dismayed by the number of so-called progressives who dismissed this likelihood back in 2016 when they rejected Hillary Clinton and advocated support for a third party candidate. Or those so-called accelerationist progressives who want to see it all burned down in the name of a Vermont senator.

Damnit, everything I supported and was happy to see put in place as a young woman is getting torn down. And their response? Student loan cancellation is a priority. No concern about voter suppression, or rights for women, people of color, and LBGTQ+ people. Watch now for rollbacks for people with disabilities.


Chapter One, Part One, Repairing the Legacy

With this segment of Chapter One of Repairing the Legacy, we begin the serialization of Repairing the Legacy. This is a rough draft work in progress and may not reflect the final form. Time period: set after the ending of The Martiniere Legacy main trilogy, before the Epilogue (for this chapter). I’m breaking longer chapters into sections for readability.

December, 2059

RUBY

Ruby Barkley scowled as she held up one of her favorite nice winter sweaters, a green cashmere that she’d splurged on three years ago, studying it closely. Was this going to…


That person hasn't a faintest clue if she says that writers don't beg (I haven't seen the article, which makes me wonder about who the person is...but that's my story). I also wonder just how privileged she is to be able to say something like that, because OF COURSE WRITERS BEG.

We beg for people to read and buy our work. We beg for reviews. If we go the traditional publishing route, we beg for agents to represent us and acquisitions editors to buy our books. We beg for readers to show up at readings and other public appearances.

There…


Rolls eyes. Of course you enjoyed one of the most privileged, exploitative sections of PDX; the one most recently transformed by newcomers to the city to be like the places they came from.

Don't get me wrong. The Pearl is a nice enough place to visit. But it is the place for the privileged to hang out, live, and engage in conspicous consumption. It's a cheap imitation of densely populated metropolises in Europe and Asia, overlaid on a former warehouse district.

I lived in Portland for over 30 years and saw the transformation. It used to be a fairly vibrant, working class city. Not so much that any more.


Honestly? I'm writing on Medium because, like my fiction, I write the sort of thing that doesn't quite fit traditional publishing. I played around with creative nonfiction essays but balked at the common tendency in those markets to charge a submission fee (look, I write science fiction and fantasy fiction, primarily. Many of those publications use the identical submission portal to those lit mags who charge).

The other piece? I miss the era of LiveJournal and blogging. Dreamwidth isn't the same, and getting responses/following from my WordPress journal isn't as easy. At least on Medium I have people I like…

Joyce Reynolds-Ward

Author. Teacher. Horsewoman. Liberal country girl split between urban/rural life, writing science fiction, fantasy, poems, and essays from the wide open spaces.

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